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Using Case Studies to Improve Internal Business Operation

Posted on April 27 2016 | Author: Britney Hess

Using Case Studies to Improve Internal Business Operation

Internal case studies can introduce a company’s values to employees. They can also be used as an effective tool to evaluate key lessons learned, including best practices and potential areas for improvement.


Why should you use case studies for training new employees?
In a small start-up, it can be easy to maintain communication flow between the founder or CEO and the small team that is driving the business forward. Growth is often a goal of smaller start-ups, however many challenges can be associated with it, including the onboarding process. Internal case studies can be used as a time-sensitive training method to convey the organization’s values, processes, and key historical events (e.g. important clients or pivot points). Additionally, they can stimulate discussions around improving internal processes.

What does an internal case study look like?
A typical business case study is a detailed account of what happened in a particular company, industry, or project over a set period of time. Having case studies from several departments in the organization helps to give employees a broad understanding of the company’s goals.

The reader is given details about the situation, often in a historical context. Objectives and challenges are outlined, followed by actions taken, conclusions, and lessons learned from the experience.

What are the benefits of using internal case studies?

  • Expedites the onboarding process - faster understanding of company culture and history.
  • Stimulates discussion - allows conversations to start regarding best practices.
  • Prevents repeat mistakes – learning from the past.

Getting started – how should you write a case study for training purposes?

  • The goal is to capture an interesting situation or challenge, and then bring it to life with words and information. Creating a story line makes the information engaging.
  • Make sure readers can skim the page for the relevant information. Certain formats can help facilitate this, such as headings or subheadings.
  • Highlight certain sections like “lessons learned” or include a short summary or timeline. Visuals are helpful.
  • Find a case study template and stick to it.

Britney Hess
Junior Analyst

 

Resources

University of Notre Dame, how to write a business case study: http://www3.nd.edu/~sbyrnes1/pdf/Writing_Resources/Writing_Case_Study.pdf

Using case studies for knowledge transfer:
https://www.td.org/Publications/Blogs/L-and-D-Blog/2012/07/Using-Case-Studies-in-Learning-and-Development-Projects-a-Lessons-Learned-Approach.aspx?_ga=1.88559835.1336840469.1460658580

Photo by:
Best Finance. (2015). How to Choose a Currency for Your Offshore Bank Account. Retrived from: bestfinancenetwork.com/tag/banking-services






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